Woke with a chord question

Synchro

The artist formerly known as: Synchro
Staff member
Jun 2, 2008
26,695
Tucson
Yes page 15 and it is a terrible struggle at which point I turn around and don it again. I suspect it will be months and months before I am comfortable enough to move on maybe a lot longer! I try to move on even when some things don’t click because I have a bad habit of sitting on something until I think it’s perfect but if I had take a few extra steps and went back to it it would have come quicker.
Don’t give up. The first few scales are the hardest. It’s worth the effort. Play very slowly. I had to, when I first went through it.
Ugh. Didn't mean to stop there! But this thing won't let me move the cursor past the emoji. Anyway. Here's the book, in all its '70s glory. Mine didn't have the dustjacket.

It's a very thorough treatment, and made tons of sense to a total beginner. Well, not total -- I had a couple of years of piano lessons, so I could read music and had some basic notions. But this book really put it all together in a very good, very accessible way. And now I'll have to check out this other book! Never cracked it!

The one I own that makes my head explode is Mark Levine's Jazz Theory. Helps a ton with understanding theory in general, but I often wonder if anyone really approaches playing with the kind of insane overthink that book engenders. It's overwhelming.
IMO, the absolute great guitar method is yet to be written. The Smith book is pretty amazingly good, but it’s not beginner material.
 

Bertotti

Gretschified
Jul 20, 2017
10,157
South Dakota
Well, I have futzed through to page 15 and futzed is an understatement. I am now focusing on each individually to get it right.

When it comes to this I am a beginner and this book is a fun challenge! I wish I had more time to mess around it can only absorb for about 15 minutes a shot before my brain starts to shut down. But once it clicks onto something an hour can vanish With what seems like a few notes!
 

Bertotti

Gretschified
Jul 20, 2017
10,157
South Dakota
Another comment. I have multiple mandolin metheods but just a couple guitar books. Method books especially mandolin method books can be very dry like sitting through rote memorization of math tables back in elementary school in the early ‘70s. Yes, mam, 8x5=40 8x6=48 8x7=, bang head hits the desk. John get up here and hold your nose in the circle, which was drawn a couple inches higher than my nose so I had to stand on my top toes. then say some smart ass thing and get to stay in from recess and write 10000 time on the black board, I will not back talk the teacher!
 

Synchro

The artist formerly known as: Synchro
Staff member
Jun 2, 2008
26,695
Tucson
Well, I have futzed through to page 15 and futzed is an understatement. I am now focusing on each individually to get it right.

When it comes to this I am a beginner and this book is a fun challenge! I wish I had more time to mess around it can only absorb for about 15 minutes a shot before my brain starts to shut down. But once it clicks onto something an hour can vanish With what seems like a few notes!
I’m assuming that you are stuck at the two octave scales.

The Type One scale superimposes over the first, open position, C chord that you learned, so anchor to the first position, 1st finger at the 1st fret and play a C scale, starting at the 3rd fret of the 5th string. When you get to the end of the first octave, just keep going, D on the 3rd fret of the 2nd string, open E on the 1st string, F on the 1st fret, G on the 3rd fret then, move your entire hand, to the 5th position, 1st finger on the 5th fret, 3rd finger on the 7th fret, 4th finger on the 8th fret. Go slowly, even painfully slow, and concentrate on precision. Strict alternate picking and careful place of the fingers on the left hand. Start with that one scale, and play it as the first and last thing you do, every time you pick up your guitar. Play it S-L-O-W, real S-L-O-W. Nope, your still doing it too fast. :)

I’m not going to kid anybody, at the beginning, this is not easy, because you are suppressing your every learned habit, and learning new procedural memories. The first scale is exponentially harder than the ones to follow. Essentially, you are going to learn six movable scale forms, plus the adaptations of those six forms for positions that include open, un-fretted, notes. If you go one at a time, pretty soon you will recognize all six forms and be able to move them to whatever position/key you want.
 

Bertotti

Gretschified
Jul 20, 2017
10,157
South Dakota
I’m back into the Johnny Smith book page six. And I believe it only just clicked on one thing. so obvious I don’t know how I missed it at first so correct me if I’m wrong. One ledger line below treble clef and one ledger line above bass clef is middle C. I notice looking at the piano. Although I dont always pick correctly on piano which is middle C. Oppps!
 

Synchro

The artist formerly known as: Synchro
Staff member
Jun 2, 2008
26,695
Tucson
I’m back into the Johnny Smith book page six. And I believe it only just clicked on one thing. so obvious I don’t know how I missed it at first so correct me if I’m wrong. One ledger line below treble clef and one ledger line above bass clef is middle C. I notice looking at the piano. Although I dont always pick correctly on piano which is middle C. Oppps!
Perfect! IMHO, guitar should be written in both treble and bass clefs.
 

Synchro

The artist formerly known as: Synchro
Staff member
Jun 2, 2008
26,695
Tucson
Why oh why are the staffs written with so many ledger lines between them?
They don’t need to be. Those ledger lines, after the first one (Middle C) are just the bass clef. Here’s the rub, most guitar music is notated one octave above the pitch it’s actually played at. So the A, on the second space of the treble clef is actually the A at the fifth fret of the first string. Middle C is the first fret of the second string. Every note below that is in the bass clef.

So that first scale, starts in the first position, hence the Roman I. Third fret (3) of the fifth string (circled 5). It’s a bit daunting, at first, but it’s actually a good system. Once you get out of the scales with open string notes, the forms are all movable, and it becomes a lot easier.
 


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