Why Are Vintage Style Junior Guitars So Expensive?

Henry

I Bleed Orange
Apr 9, 2014
19,256
Petaluma
I’m not sure about that. Boomers who did well can retire with more coming in than while they were working. But with age comes wisdom. I have more than I need and little I want but have no desire to buy what I don’t need or have little use for. I don’t know about the next generation. What helped my wife and me was a defined benefit pension, a 401K, social security, and my wife still working part time selling insurance. The company I worked for ended it’s contributions to pensions. Social security is always on the chopping block. A 401K relies on sustainable, or at least cyclical growth and active asset management. Maybe I just proved myself wrong. Mine may be the last generation where this confluence is possible.
And you are one person. There are almost 70 million boomers in the US. Second largest "gen" and by far the wealthiest, regardless of one person's financial situation.
 

Lou Coppolino

Country Gent
Jul 23, 2022
1,474
Howell, NJ
Don't forget Lou,

There's Reverb prices, and then there's everyone else, and...

The advertised price, and the sold price are often worlds apart.

With any guitar advertised on Reverb, that has caught my interest, I've always contacted the owner directly as Reverb's ''broker'' commission is high, and they tack a surcharge on shipping costs as well.

Best,

BIB.


Very true.

The fact still remains that you need to save to acquire things that in the past were more accessible.

I attached a file in another thread indicating the price increase of a Gretsch White Falcon.

I paid a lot but getting one now will cost more.
 

wabash slim

I Bleed Orange
Feb 10, 2010
18,874
lafayette in
Don't forget Lou,

There's Reverb prices, and then there's everyone else, and...

The advertised price, and the sold price are often worlds apart.

With any guitar advertised on Reverb, that has caught my interest, I've always contacted the owner directly as Reverb's ''broker'' commission is high, and they tack a surcharge on shipping costs as well.

Best,

BIB.
What you ask for and what you get can be two wildly different things.
 

jvin248

Gretschie
May 16, 2017
249
Near Detroit
.

Vintage guitars are expensive because Fender and Gibson desperately need players to desire their old guitars the most. That is how they stay relevant and profitable. If you were around in the 1980s you would have seen Fender and Gibson struggle when other newly-minted MIA and import brands convinced guitar buyers in the new MTV-era to sport pointy guitars in neon colors to go with spandex and big hair. New was vastly better than old.

Eventually 'unplugged' and 'grunge' allowed Fender and Gibson to return to their marketing plans, including 'relic' guitars, so they could restore profitability. They quickly bought all those startup brands that nearly killed them the prior decade. All is right with the world as old-is-best again!

.
 

wildeman

I Bleed Orange
May 10, 2015
16,376
norcal
I bought a used Epi SG Jr with a bolt-on neck and upgraded pickup for a $100 bucks. I’d gig it, seriously.
That's what I'm thinking, I have a free Epi Jr that I put tuners, new pots/cap and a $50.00 used Lollar P90 in that can do anything, and do it well.
 

blueruins

Friend of Fred
May 28, 2013
5,066
Savannah, GA
.

Vintage guitars are expensive because Fender and Gibson desperately need players to desire their old guitars the most. That is how they stay relevant and profitable. If you were around in the 1980s you would have seen Fender and Gibson struggle when other newly-minted MIA and import brands convinced guitar buyers in the new MTV-era to sport pointy guitars in neon colors to go with spandex and big hair. New was vastly better than old.

Eventually 'unplugged' and 'grunge' allowed Fender and Gibson to return to their marketing plans, including 'relic' guitars, so they could restore profitability. They quickly bought all those startup brands that nearly killed them the prior decade. All is right with the world as old-is-best again!

.
Interesting take🤔
 

afire

Friend of Fred
Feb 12, 2009
6,005
Where the action is!
The cynical view might be that the prediction that the vintage guitar market will collapse when Boomers are gone is another example of that generation's belief that the sun rises and sets on them. I don't know. I'm not invested in vintage guitars and would be very happy to see the prices go back to '80s levels, but I'm sure not holding my breath.
 

loudnlousy

Gretschified
Gold Supporting Member
Oct 18, 2015
12,749
Germany
You should not look on an expensive guitar as an investment unless you are a dealer.
If your heart tells you that you cannot live without a guitar and your wallet allows you to buy it you should do so just to make you happy.
That goes with vintage guitars and Custom Shop guitars as well.
If you do not intend to sell them in your lifetime "the market" does not matter at all.

...although in my case I was very happy that "the market" was just on an upswing when I had to sell them out of sheer need.
 

Lou Coppolino

Country Gent
Jul 23, 2022
1,474
Howell, NJ
The cynical view might be that the prediction that the vintage guitar market will collapse when Boomers are gone is another example of that generation's belief that the sun rises and sets on them. I don't know. I'm not invested in vintage guitars and would be very happy to see the prices go back to '80s levels, but I'm sure not holding my breath.


80's price levels were very different from 60's levels.

I bought, and still have, a Fender Graffiti Yellow American Standard Stratocaster that I bought for $200.00.

Those American Standard Stratocasters were less than $500.00 new in the early days.

I turned away from black panel Fender Bassman heads that were $75.00 in the 70's.

Today is another price range.

I hope those baby boomers, who still play guitar, are smart enough to handle today's exorbitant prices.

There's no right or wrong.

Lust plays a roll.

I'm an example of lust and impulse buys.
 


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