Vintage Gretschs at Pittsburgh Guitar Show

Lou Coppolino

Country Gent
Jul 23, 2022
1,468
Howell, NJ
November 5th & 6th in Philadelphia. I might actually get to be there... first show for me since before Covid.


I'm hoping to be there Saturday, Nov.5.

 

Back in Black

Country Gent
Double Platinum Member
Jun 22, 2020
1,747
Ontario Canada
Oh My Brothers...and Sisters

If...and I said ''if'' the Duo Jet ends up in the hands of a clever restorer, the guitar will be fully ''aged'' repaired, fitted out with cosmetically aged ''correct parts''

And...resold as ''Original 58 Duo Jet'', Excellent, for maybe 10 K.

And you know what, it will sell.

The ''none the wiser'' purchaser, will be over the moon...and...All is right with the world!

If the restoration work is performed correctly... the new buyer would still be better off, than paying 12 K for a Custom Shop Jet of the same vintage! Regardless of repairs/replacements/restoration, it's still a classic 64 year old, American made, Gretsch Duo Jet.

As I mentioned earlier, an intact, interior cavity label is important.

I'm too honest to pull the wool over anyone's eyes ,and Karma will get ya, but it can easily be done, and will very likely be done!

The guitar show buyer must have had stars in his eyes then he saw this Duo Jet.

This little Jet, is a restorer's dream come true!

Best,

BIB
 
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6187LX

Gretschie
Aug 11, 2022
220
Up Around the Bend
Ed,
I distinctly remember the 6188. It had the slimmer 2.75" body and the Deluxe (as in the 1956 Gretsch catalog debut of the Clipper) "G" tailpiece. Single Dyna. And a good pic of the Gretsch label. I do realize that this is a little like saying you've seen a UFO but I lost the post-it with the serial number. Cheers, lx.
 

Pemberton

Gretschie
Gold Supporting Member
May 4, 2022
317
Pennsylvania, USA
...resold as ''Original 58 Duo Jet'', Excellent, for maybe 10 K.
I’m curious, what would it be worth with the restoration you speak of but with “full disclosure” of everything that’s been done? And what would all of the period-correct parts cost? The only original parts I think were the knobs. Pickups and all wiring were new, plus replaced tuners and added Bigsby. Don’t know what the original bridge might have been.

I’m also too honest to not disclose everything I know of the history of a guitar.

I’ve seen some vintage Gretschs listed that I know have had their binding replaced, but the seller didn’t disclose that. I feel they should have. It wouldn’t be a deal breaker for me, but I would definitely like to know before buying, even if it was done so well that it was hard to tell.
 
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LesB3

Gretschie
Silver Member
Aug 17, 2021
376
Philadelphia, PA
I’m curious, what would it be worth with the restoration you speak of but with “full disclosure” of everything that’s been done? And what would all of the period-correct parts cost? The only original parts I think were the knobs. Pickups and all wiring were new, plus replaced tuners and added Bigsby. Don’t know what the original bridge might have been.

Well, you would need new tuners, pickups, wiring harness, and the "G" tailpiece. Pickguard would be optional, but necessary if trying to pass off as 100% vintage.

The headstock has been punched out for those Grovers, so you'll need something that will hide that fact, plus those stupid Stat-Tites that are everywhere when you don't need them, but nowhere to be found when you do. $100 for "correct" tuners, plugging the bigger holes would be on you.

You might be able to fake it with a 60's harness (and some soldering) -another $150. The tailpieces show up every now and then ($250-$300), but the space-control bridges are getting harder to find and more expensive ($150-$200). Again, you might be able to "fake it" with a 60's SC bridge, but we're starting to get into enough deviances that someone would notice.

The long pole in that tent would be the pickups, since '58 would have meant "PAF" covers, no? $1500, maybe more...

I don't think you'd get $10k for one, more like $7k - $8k (and you would have to LIE about the restoration work). I'd guess that with full disclosure (and the use of true vintage parts), you might get $5k - $6k? But at that price, you might be breaking even at best.

I'd make a few tweaks (maybe replace the bridge and tailpiece, replace the buttons on the Grovers) to give it the outward appearance of an original, but keep it as a "player grade" piece. If the pickups are TVJ's you could sell those and put towards PAF-covered Ray Butts PUPS (which is what I'm putting in my '59) or leave be.

I think this guitar's value is in its "giggability" -you could play your '58 Jet at the local bar for about the price of a new one without worrying (too much) about getting beer on it.
 

stiv

Country Gent
Sep 12, 2014
2,639
Firenze, Italy
Usually a restoration project (even with all original parts, that btw are hard to find and extremely expensive in these days, not only vintage guitars prices are up, but also vintage parts... and usually more.) sells for a lot less than an all original Jet (over here you could find an full original, not modded, for around 8000 euros). If you cut the cost of the parts and the refinish job (there's no way you could sell a spray painted Jet as is, especially to someone who wants vintage...), I think you'd barely making the money you paid for it.
I've been on that road trying to restore my Rally. After I discovered that 2 original '67 pickup rings would cost me around 200 dollars, I decided that I'll leave it as a player. ;)
At that price, and with the right amount of money in my pocket (that means I'm not worried if it's not a bargain), I'd have buyed and leave it alone. It looked good and had mojo. :)
 

Back in Black

Country Gent
Double Platinum Member
Jun 22, 2020
1,747
Ontario Canada
I’m curious, what would it be worth with the restoration you speak of but with “full disclosure” of everything that’s been done? And what would all of the period-correct parts cost? The only original parts I think were the knobs. Pickups and all wiring were new, plus replaced tuners and added Bigsby. Don’t know what the original bridge might have been.

I’m also too honest to not disclose everything I know of the history of a guitar.

I’ve seen some vintage Gretschs listed that I know have had their binding replaced, but the seller didn’t disclose that. I feel they should have. It wouldn’t be a deal breaker for me, but I would definitely like to know before buying, even if it was done so well that it was hard to tell.
Pemberton,

Your question pegged my interest, and got me out of bed early to do a little research.

First of all, the guitar show Duo Jet, is not a 1958.

If it's in fact original, and not a well used ''older'' re-issue, it's likely a 1959.

The first attached photo, is a re-issue 1959, the rest of the photos, are all the same correctly configured, original 1958 Gretsch, 6128 Duo Jet.

The differences are obvious, with the standout being, three tone/volume pots, as opposed to two.

This is where research, model familiarity, and serial number familiarity are very important. The three things, a guitar show hawker does not want you to have.

The photo with the rear cavity cover off clearly shows the ''hidden'' model #/serial # label. This label, is worth the value of the guitar.

To answer your question, full disclosure, professional repair work, period correct parts, all have value, and should not be de-valued.

Once the work is completed, sell with fair market value in mind, bargain hard, stand your ground!

The writeup on the original Jet I have illustrated, list the thumb-nail inlays, Dynasonic PU's, and Melita Synchro-Sonic bridge as a rare combination.

Best,

BIB.

DSCF1580.JPG 1958 Gretsch 6128 Duo Jet.jpg 1958 Gretsch 6128 Duo Jet 2.jpg 1958 Gretsch 6128 Gretsch Dou Jet 5.jpg 1958 Gretsch 6128 Duo Jet 3.jpg 1958 Gretsch 6128 Duo Jet 4.jpg 1958 Gretsch 6128 Duo Jet 6.jpg
 
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Pemberton

Gretschie
Gold Supporting Member
May 4, 2022
317
Pennsylvania, USA
@LesB3 @stiv @Back in Black

Thanks for all of the knowledgeable replies. All good-to-know info. Biggest takeaway, before spending thousands of dollars (or wasting it), buyers have to do their homework and know their stuff. Otherwise there’s disappointment and frustration waiting down the road. Nobody wants to learn stuff the hard way.
 

Back in Black

Country Gent
Double Platinum Member
Jun 22, 2020
1,747
Ontario Canada
@LesB3 @stiv @Back in Black

Thanks for all of the knowledgeable replies. All good-to-know info. Biggest takeaway, before spending thousands of dollars (or wasting it), buyers have to do their homework and know their stuff. Otherwise there’s disappointment and frustration waiting down the road. Nobody wants to learn stuff the hard way.
Yes, and you don't have to look too far down the road either!

Best,

BIB.
 

Wayne Gretschzky

Country Gent
Gold Supporting Member
Aug 27, 2008
3,661
East Coast
The t
Ed,
I distinctly remember the 6188. It had the slimmer 2.75" body and the Deluxe (as in the 1956 Gretsch catalog debut of the Clipper) "G" tailpiece. Single Dyna. And a good pic of the Gretsch label. I do realize that this is a little like saying you've seen a UFO but I lost the post-it with the serial number. Cheers, lx.

The truth is out there... ! (queue the eerie music)
 


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