Strap lock help please

mrfixitmi

Country Gent
Mar 20, 2010
1,957
Michigan
Usually just if something rotates, to keep from accidentally unscrewing it self.

Left hand thread is more common than what we might imagine. Rotation is one of the main reasons as stated.

Fans are known to use left-hand retaining caps (nuts) so that the fan blade does not com loose when in use. Automotive have used right and left hand self adjusters on brake systems. Accidentally interchanging these will lead to brakes too tight on one side, and no action on the other side. Caliper pistons can thread in and out in opposite directions.
If anyone is old as me will remember working on a Valmobile with the infamous left-hand threaded flywheel nut. Miss observing this will usually end up in a broken crankshaft.

It is very common in mechanical watches to use left hand threads on the ratchet winding wheels, this is used so the wheel does not come off/loose during winding. Sometimes you will find that the pinion ratchet wheel is attached with a left hand screw, and the ratchet wheel mounted to the spring barrel is right-hand thread.

I am not sure why this was done, but I can see a benefit of when unscrewing a Gretsch knob, the retaining screw will assure that the retaining stud stays in the body. But the downside is if you tighten the knob too much, you can actually start to remove the stud.

The Schaller type retainer does not put a rotational force on the strap button/mounting screw. The collar rotate freely around the button. Those screws are right-hand thread.
 

Lindo

Gretschie
Mar 10, 2019
116
Derbyshire
I intend to replace the Gretsch strap buttons on my 5232 with ordinary non-locking ones. Will I need a left handed screw to attach them?
 

Randy99CL

Country Gent
Feb 17, 2020
2,190
Albuquerque
Yes. Back in the days when British sports cars had wire wheels with knock-off hubs, things would get "interesting" if a mechanic put the left hubs on the right side and vice-versa!
In the mid-70s I bought a '68 Triumph TR-250 while I was stationed in Spain.
It had the center nuts holding the wire wheels on and a big wrench you hit with a hammer. They quit using the knock-offs much earlier as too easy to steal.
There was no way you could cross-thread them, they were a course thread. They were also marked as to which side they fit and direction of thread. On the passenger side they were threaded counter-clockwise.
1968-triumph-tr250.jpg
 
Last edited:

Randy99CL

Country Gent
Feb 17, 2020
2,190
Albuquerque
I have put Dunlop strap locks on all my guitars, including the G5129. I had no problems, I unscrewed the stock screws from the body and screwed in the others, they were slightly larger and a good snug fit.

Dunlop locks work great. Quite a bit cheaper than the others, especially because you can buy the buttons separately (about $8 a set) when you add more guitars.
I use them on all my guitars because I can share straps and save some money. I own about half as many straps as guitars and I never leave the strap on in the case. I have some expensive straps and have saved a ton.
 
Last edited:

Runamok

Country Gent
In the mid-70s I bought a '68 Triumph TR-250 while I was stationed in Spain.
It had the center nuts holding the wire wheels on and a big wrench you hit with a hammer. They quit using the knock-offs much earlier as too easy to steal.
There was no way you could cross-thread them, they were a course thread. They were also marked as to which side they fit and direction of thread. On the passenger side they were threaded counter-clockwise.
View attachment 186875
Pretty sure in the Upside-Down
they use left-handed strap locks.
 

Runamok

Country Gent
With the strap buttons I can see a theory for LH threads in the wood screw. If the actual button tends to seize onto the wood screw part over time using a little force to unscrew it tightens the woodscrew into the body. I guess the theory is that one should not use a lot of force to attach the knob/strap or the opposite is the result. Just a guess.....
You have to buy them to match the wood grain of your guitar. 😆 🙈
 

capnhiho

Country Gent
Feb 16, 2013
1,467
California
@Lindo : You may want to consider relocating the strap pin to the neck heel to counter neck dive. I found the neck dive of my Double Jet somewhat annoying until I moved the strap attachment point to the heel. I installed Dunlop Straploks during this process as well. Pleased with the results… although now I have a small hole to fill.
1660057557578.jpeg
 

GlenP

Country Gent
Jul 23, 2019
2,463
WA
Another example: the left pedal on a bicycle is threaded left handed onto the crank.
 

Lindo

Gretschie
Mar 10, 2019
116
Derbyshire
@Lindo : You may want to consider relocating the strap pin to the neck heel to counter neck dive. I found the neck dive of my Double Jet somewhat annoying until I moved the strap attachment point to the heel. I installed Dunlop Straploks during this process as well. Pleased with the results… although now I have a small hole to fill.
View attachment 186886

Thanks, it's the first thing I'll do. As a long time SG player, it's my preferred placement. I find it balances better, as you say, and I can move the guitar about more easily as I'm playing. I've done the same thing on my Revstar, and just live with the residual hole.

58C68D9E-A1A0-496B-9073-6B2192AD0096.jpeg
 

PHCorrigan

Gretschie
Aug 30, 2019
129
Lake Oswego, Oregon
In the mid-70s I bought a '68 Triumph TR-250 while I was stationed in Spain.
It had the center nuts holding the wire wheels on and a big wrench you hit with a hammer. They quit using the knock-offs much earlier as too easy to steal.
There was no way you could cross-thread them, they were a course thread. They were also marked as to which side they fit and direction of thread. On the passenger side they were threaded counter-clockwise.
View attachment 186875

The problem was not with the wheels, but the hubs.. The problem came when you mounted the left hubs on the right side and vice versa, which was actually very easy to do. As long as the hubs were mounted on the correct side the wheels would stay on.
 

Randy99CL

Country Gent
Feb 17, 2020
2,190
Albuquerque
The problem was not with the wheels, but the hubs.. The problem came when you mounted the left hubs on the right side and vice versa, which was actually very easy to do. As long as the hubs were mounted on the correct side the wheels would stay on.
There were adapter hubs for the wire wheels and you could put them on the wrong side.
I never had that problem because I never removed more than one at a time and only once to replace the brake pads and shoes.
Someone would have to be an absolute bonehead to replace them on the wrong side, WTH? I never heard of a mechanic that dumb and careless.
 


Top