Roller bridge to replace tune o matic?

Synchro

The artist formerly known as: Synchro
Staff member
Jun 2, 2008
25,474
Tucson
Hey everyone...Pop's just sent me a left-hand bridge that I could flip upside down and test out for all of you who have a terribly misplaced TOM bridge like mine. Here are the results:
    • The Bridge fit over the posts perfectly.
    • The angle of the cut turned out to be spot on for all strings, but...
    • The intonation on all strings turned out to be flat by 10 cents. :confused:
    • The Aluminum bridge made the high notes a little less distinct than the stock TOM.
    I think if the cut was moved toward the neck about 3/16" it would probably intonate perfectly.

    So, it was truly worth the attempt and I thank Pop's for letting me try it out before buying. He's a great guy to work with! ;)

    --Dean


  • If you're only 10 cents off I think I'd live with it. Remember, when you are playing there is a degree of side thrust on the strings so, in the real world of playing a song, most people, even those with great technique, are a bit sharp anyhow.
 

drrohle

Synchromatic
Jan 3, 2014
833
Hays, KS
If you're only 10 cents off I think I'd live with it. Remember, when you are playing there is a degree of side thrust on the strings so, in the real world of playing a song, most people, even those with great technique, are a bit sharp anyhow.

Hmmm, so do you intonate yours a little on the flat side or do you try to get it spot on?
 

Ricochet

Senior Gretsch-Talker
Nov 13, 2009
21,476
Monkey Island
Pop's just sent me a left-hand bridge that I could flip upside down.

You're not supposed to flip the Compton since the notches are individually cut for the different string gauges. Ie. First notch on one side is .010, on the other side it will be .48.
 

drrohle

Synchromatic
Jan 3, 2014
833
Hays, KS
Well, obviously I'm not getting it then. Keep calm, this has happened to me before.

We (Pop's & I) were just seeing if he could use a "blank" left-handed cut bridge, file the slots to make it a right-hander and see if that would intonate on some of these guitars that have the stock TOM bridge that had the mounts poorly drilled with too much angle (relative to the strings). Basically my stock TOM would not quite intonated because I ran out of adjustment room. (See pix on page 2 of this thread).
 

drrohle

Synchromatic
Jan 3, 2014
833
Hays, KS
I for one would really like to know why the sharp angle was put on this model Gretsch when clearly there is a problem with it?? Don't get it.
Pop's

Yeah me neither, you'd think they'd be operating off a "template" to punch those bridge holes. Who knows what goes on those Chinese factories. The store I bought it from offered to let their tech work it over for me but that store is 100 miles away and I'm getting along pretty well with it now anyway.
 

iBloke

Former Member
Hey everyone...Pop's just sent me a left-hand bridge that I could flip upside down and test out for all of you who have a terribly misplaced TOM bridge like mine. Here are the results:
    • The Bridge fit over the posts perfectly.
    • The angle of the cut turned out to be spot on for all strings, but...
    • The intonation on all strings turned out to be flat by 10 cents. :confused:
    • The Aluminum bridge made the high notes a little less distinct than the stock TOM.
    I think if the cut was moved toward the neck about 3/16" it would probably intonate perfectly.

    So, it was truly worth the attempt and I thank Pop's for letting me try it out before buying. He's a great guy to work with! ;)

    --Dean


  • Thanks Dean (& Pop's) for doing this test. At least I know for certain now that I can't successfully drop a Compton bridge straight on.

    I posted this pic earlier in this thread and as you can see by the saddle positions there is no way a non adjustable bridge will intonate correctly on my guitar
 

drrohle

Synchromatic
Jan 3, 2014
833
Hays, KS
Guess we'll have to go with an adjustable Wilkinson roller. If you do, let me know if it sucks the tone & sustain out like some have said.
 

blueruins

Country Gent
May 28, 2013
4,062
Savannah, GA
Hey now...I might have missed it but has anyone mentioned that Tru-Arc has recently developed bridges that are properly compensated for various Electromatic models?

http://www.truarcbridgeworks.com

I haven't confirmed that these are available yet, but I recall reading a post of someone who had one installed so I think they're good to go.
 

Dostegrar

Country Gent
Nov 5, 2013
1,583
Delta,b.c.
I have just ordered a stainless chambered Compton in lefty from pops as well as a nut from Jeff. My nut was cut for 11's but I've now switched to 10's, so I'm getting fret buzz and dead strings higher up. Neck is adjusted as far as I would want to go. Also, my adjust omatic bridge is buzzing. It's driving me crazy. I'm hoping the Compton will drop right on to the posts and be good, or I might have to un pin the bridge base, to intonation. My string spacing stock at the turn omatic bridge is 2 1/16". I asked pops to cut for 2 1/32" spacing because I believe this will be to what it should actually be. I'll let you know how it turns out.
 

Lizardkinged

Friend of Fred
Oct 5, 2009
7,863
Michigan
I've read this thread over. Skimmed the middle a bit so bare with me.

I'm a firm believer in the comptons, but in this case with your post alignment, you're probably going to have to try a tru-arc. They make a low-rider one that would work and one that was mentioned above. This is also a great product and is probably best suited for you. I just prefer a different one. I hope that everything works out.
 

Synchro

The artist formerly known as: Synchro
Staff member
Jun 2, 2008
25,474
Tucson
Hmmm, so do you intonate yours a little on the flat side or do you try to get it spot on?
I don't purposely intonate flat, but if there is an error I prefer it to be in the flat direction.

Intonation of guitars is a sketchy proposition on the best of days. Guitars, even the best guitars in the world, are relatively imprecise. Try measuring the pitch of every note on a string from open to the highest fret. Then try it on the neighboring string and so forth. You will probably be shocked by what you see. Every so often someone comes out with a guitar that is intonated perfectly at every fret. This requires frets that look like something out of a cubist painting. I've never seen one of these become a successful seller and it looks like it would not be easy to play.

If you want perfect intonation, ironically enough, you have to get rid of frets and have a well trained ear. When I'm in practice on my fretless bass the intonation is astounding, but that's because you learn to adjust finger position on the fly and to trust your ear. Of course all of that advantage would be lost if you tried to play chords of more than two notes on a fretless guitar. Chord forms, like guitars themselves, have a degree of built-in imprecision and relay on the frets to keep things in order.

On most guitars with unwound third strings the intonation of the G tends to run sharp. With wound third strings it may be pretty close or a little flat. For me, I'd prefer the slightly sharp G and retain the ability to make whole tone bends on the third string. Even Jim Hall, the vaunted Jazz guitarist, tended to use unwound third strings.

The entire subject of intonation is filled with murky areas and differences of opinion. The entire subject of temperament is one of the longest running disputes in history with some very strong opinions on both sides of the argument. Nothing about music is perfect, with the exception of 4ths, 5ths and octaves. :)

Where I'm concerned, it's a "shut up and play" deal. If your guitar is in tune and reasonably intonated everything will be fine. There are a very small number of people with truly perfect pitch that may be offended, but they, IMO, truly suffer for their gift. Almost all the music that they hear will be imperfect in some way.
 

Lizardkinged

Friend of Fred
Oct 5, 2009
7,863
Michigan
Not to get overly technical with playing style. but I find when I get very comfortable with an instrument, and learn it's "trouble" spots... if you could call them that... I just end up pressing harder if they're flat, and almost get to know them. sortof like how one gets to know their route to work and the potholes that develop. Which is my style of a shut up and play deal. Just push harder on this or that fret... muscle memory will take over.
 

Synchro

The artist formerly known as: Synchro
Staff member
Jun 2, 2008
25,474
Tucson
Not to get overly technical with playing style. but I find when I get very comfortable with an instrument, and learn it's "trouble" spots... if you could call them that... I just end up pressing harder if they're flat, and almost get to know them. sortof like how one gets to know their route to work and the potholes that develop. Which is my style of a shut up and play deal. Just push harder on this or that fret... muscle memory will take over.

In the final analysis, the swordsman is much more important than the sword.
 

TeeDub

Synchromatic
Jun 21, 2011
626
Colorado
Hey now...I might have missed it but has anyone mentioned that Tru-Arc has recently developed bridges that are properly compensated for various Electromatic models?

http://www.truarcbridgeworks.com

I haven't confirmed that these are available yet, but I recall reading a post of someone who had one installed so I think they're good to go.

Please note it says 'coming soon' for the pre-2011 Pro Jets. These are the ones with the severely angled bridge.
 


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