If There Were No Gretsch; What Would You Play

Synchro

The artist formerly known as: Synchro
Staff member
Jun 2, 2008
25,506
Tucson
Being deeply invested with Gretsch guitars, I was thinking of what I would do if some wormhole came along and changed history and the Gretsch line was erased from history.

I‘d probably play my Guild T-400, which comes pretty close to a Gretsch sound, or a Tele, which always seems to suit me. Of course, without Gretsch, there may never have been a Duane Eddy model Guild, to begin with, because it was built to Duane‘s specifications after having made his mark, playing a G6120.

So how about y’all?
 

mbkri

Country Gent
Sep 22, 2012
2,839
Chicago
Fender solids and Gibson hollows.
Ive sold all my Fenders but I’d go straight to a tele and a 61 Jazzmaster.
I love my es295 and my Gibson accoustic but i reckon a 335 would round out my stable.
I wouldnt sound like i do but Id like how i sound. I think id have written different songs and played with different techniques if there had never been Gretsch guitars.
 

Baba Joe

Gretschie
Feb 17, 2010
192
new jersey
Probably whatever brand George Harrison was playing on 2/9/1964. I saw him on the Ed Sullivan Show and wanted what he had. Obviously, I liked the tone as well and have been a Gretsch fan ever since, but he is the reason I started playing and wanted Gretsch.

Stretch the original question a little further and if the Beatles never existed, I was always attracted to the ES 335/45/55 and would probably play Gibsons.
 

Synchro

The artist formerly known as: Synchro
Staff member
Jun 2, 2008
25,506
Tucson
Some interesting answers.

I hadn’t thought of the ES 335 as an answer, but that makes a lot of sense. The 335 is a great instrument, and one of the most versatile guitars on the planet. They were a staple in the studio world, for just this reason. They are excellent Rock guitars, essentially a Les Paul, but it’s also capable of sounding like a serious Jazz guitar.

OTOH. the Tele is not at all surprising. Once again, harking back to the days of the LA session scene, the Tele was another staple. If you heard a bright, twangy guitar on a record coming out of the LA studios in the ‘60s, it was very likely to have been a Telecaster. Teles are also useful for a sound that is somewhat closer to the classic Gretsch sound, and Teles excel at this. Going back to the ‘90s, I used a Tele for a Chet Atkins sound, and it did quite well.

Probably whatever brand George Harrison was playing on 2/9/1964. I saw him on the Ed Sullivan Show and wanted what he had. Obviously, I liked the tone as well and have been a Gretsch fan ever since, but he is the reason I started playing and wanted Gretsch.

Stretch the original question a little further and if the Beatles never existed, I was always attracted to the ES 335/45/55 and would probably play Gibsons.
Brilliant answer.
 


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