Gretsch streamliner 6190-1

ER69

Electromatic
May 15, 2020
8
US
Hey all!
I have this guitar that has been sitting in my closet that I have not had the time to restore.

I believe it's a 1956 model. It's a Streamliner Electromatic 6190-1.

Would anyone know how to date it, or the type of pickup this would've had originally?
If I remember correctly, it would've been a DeArmond Dynasonic single coil pickup.

I have the case, which seems to be original as well.

Any info is greatly appreciated. Also looking to sell if anyone is interested. It's just been sitting there and needs to be played
Screenshot_20220918-130411_Reverb.jpg
 

Attachments

  • Screenshot_20220918-130521_Reverb.jpg
    Screenshot_20220918-130521_Reverb.jpg
    265.7 KB · Views: 17
  • Screenshot_20220918-130515_Reverb.jpg
    Screenshot_20220918-130515_Reverb.jpg
    183.2 KB · Views: 11
  • Screenshot_20220918-130502_Reverb.jpg
    Screenshot_20220918-130502_Reverb.jpg
    127.5 KB · Views: 13
  • Screenshot_20220918-130451_Reverb.jpg
    Screenshot_20220918-130451_Reverb.jpg
    102 KB · Views: 16
  • Screenshot_20220918-130440_Reverb.jpg
    Screenshot_20220918-130440_Reverb.jpg
    124 KB · Views: 15
  • Screenshot_20220918-130429_Reverb.jpg
    Screenshot_20220918-130429_Reverb.jpg
    120.6 KB · Views: 20
  • Screenshot_20220918-130421_Reverb.jpg
    Screenshot_20220918-130421_Reverb.jpg
    221.2 KB · Views: 21

tartanphantom

Friend of Fred
Jul 30, 2008
6,056
Murfreesboro, TN
If I am reading that serial number correctly (09953), then that guitar is from the very first batch of that model, built late in 1952 and sold as a 1953 model, as that is when the model debuted.

It would have been originally appointed with a DeArmond Dynasonic, a Melita bridge, and clear plastic control knobs. Obviously, all those have been swapped out.
 

ER69

Electromatic
May 15, 2020
8
US
Thank you so much!
I've looked online for original parts and a) they don't really exist, or b) the ones that are out there are going for an arm and a leg.

Do you or anyone know of where I can get a pick guard made for it along with the clear knows?
 

Wayne Gretschzky

Country Gent
Gold Supporting Member
Aug 27, 2008
3,632
East Coast
Thank you so much!
I've looked online for original parts and a) they don't really exist, or b) the ones that are out there are going for an arm and a leg.

Do you or anyone know of where I can get a pick guard made for it along with the clear knows?
Original parts are out there... but you'll need to be patient and keep looking. And... vintage parts will always cost more than modern repros. Repros won't make it any more salable than what's on there now. Do you know if the current pickup required and expansion of the route? This 6190-1 model, the precursor to the Streamliner models released in '54, don't have an adjustable truss rod at the headstock... unlike the later iterations of the 6190.
 

ER69

Electromatic
May 15, 2020
8
US
Not sure, to be completely honest. I havent wanted to take anything apart just for the simple fact that I'd rather have a professional do it.
Despite it lacking certain parts, it plays great, sounds great. Maybe a bit of fret wear. But nothing major.
 

tartanphantom

Friend of Fred
Jul 30, 2008
6,056
Murfreesboro, TN
The most difficult thing to replace with vintage parts will be the knobs. Vintage Dynasonics and Melita bridges are more common, but still pricey.
However, you almost never see Vintage Gretsch clear knobs.

There are modern repros of the knobs being made, but they are usually sized for metric coarse knurl spline pots, as that is what is used in the current modern Streamliner line. Consequently, they may not fit the original pots.

A modern dynasonic neck pickup will run you $150-180, a modern Gretsch Synchrosonic (Melita) Bridge will run $100-150, and modern repro plastic knobs will run you around $12-20 for a set of four.

For vintage replacement parts, double those price ranges, except for the knobs-- in that case triple or quadruple them.

If you install a Dynasonic, you will probably need a riser mounting ring as well-- $15-20 new, and as for vintage... well, they practically don't exist, as most of them were made of celluloid and have a nasty habit of disintegrating due to age.
 
Last edited:

ER69

Electromatic
May 15, 2020
8
US
I have noticed that the knobs were way pricier! I wondered why, but that would make sense about the sizing. You think those could be modified?

I need to sit down one of these days and see what else I'll need or anything I haven't yet discovered.
It'll definitely be an interesting project. And I've had the guitar for a while, just doesn't get used as much.
 

afire

Friend of Fred
Feb 12, 2009
5,962
Where the action is!
Repros won't make it any more salable than what's on there now.
I don't know that I'd say that. A guitar with the "right" parts, even if not original, presents quite a bit better than one with the "wrong" parts.
Do you know if the current pickup required and expansion of the route?
And that's one reason why.

About the knobs, I'm fairly certain that DeArmond was the supplier and they can be found on some other DeArmond products.
 

Wayne Gretschzky

Country Gent
Gold Supporting Member
Aug 27, 2008
3,632
East Coast
I don't know that I'd say that. A guitar with the "right" parts, even if not original, presents quite a bit better than one with the "wrong" parts.
No doubt... but the guitar isn't a very collectible model, and sinking a few hundred more dollars on correct (reissue or vintage) probably won't be recovered on resale... IMHO.
 

Irish-Jay

Electromatic
Silver Member
Jul 2, 2015
44
Vancouver, WA
I have noticed that the knobs were way pricier! I wondered why, but that would make sense about the sizing. You think those could be modified?

I need to sit down one of these days and see what else I'll need or anything I haven't yet discovered.
It'll definitely be an interesting project. And I've had the guitar for a while, just doesn't get used as much.
That sounds like an awesome project! Not trying to spend your money, but were I the proud owner of that specimen, I’d get the original knobs. Best success either way!
 

afire

Friend of Fred
Feb 12, 2009
5,962
Where the action is!
No doubt... but the guitar isn't a very collectible model, and sinking a few hundred more dollars on correct (reissue or vintage) probably won't be recovered on resale... IMHO.
From that perspective, I would totally agree. If you're selling it, don't put money into it. Spending money on correct parts will help its value, but not by as much as you'll spend on the parts.
I wonder if our old friend WindsorDave would have any thoughts about the cutaway on this guitar. 😏 I actually played one not long ago, and I swear, it makes no difference at all.
 

ER69

Electromatic
May 15, 2020
8
US
Does anyone have any idea what kind of pickup this is?
It appears to be an old p90. Maybe a 50s model? (Wishful thinking)
 

Attachments

  • 20221106_102252.jpg
    20221106_102252.jpg
    188.2 KB · Views: 4
  • 20221106_102232.jpg
    20221106_102232.jpg
    194.7 KB · Views: 4
  • 20221106_102207.jpg
    20221106_102207.jpg
    173.2 KB · Views: 4

GVDobler

Synchromatic
Gold Supporting Member
May 15, 2011
955
Las Vegas
Cool guitar for sure.
So what's it worth as it sits?
Why are the vintage knobs described in metrics?
 


Top