G5427 bridge question

David MacNeill

Electromatic
Gold Supporting Member
Nov 13, 2022
44
Boise ID
My brand new G5427 has a stationary bridge that feels like it’s glued to the top. Is it pinned like my circa 2005 PowerJet was, or glued — or both?
 
Last edited:

tartanphantom

Friend of Fred
Jul 30, 2008
6,060
Murfreesboro, TN
It's not pinned in the traditional sense. It is what Gretsch calls "secured". This means that the bridge posts themselves are screwed directly into the top (through the bridge base). In this arrangement, the bridge base is essentially just window dressing, as it is not floating in any way.
Traditional pinning with grub screws underneath the bridge still leave the string pressure on the floating bridge base.
 

David MacNeill

Electromatic
Gold Supporting Member
Nov 13, 2022
44
Boise ID
It's not pinned in the tradtional sense. it is what Gretsch calls "secured". This means that the bridge posts themselves are screwed directly into the top (through the bridge base). In this arrangement, the bridge base is essentially just window dressing, as it is not floating in any way.
Thank you. That’s all fine with me. One less thing to worry about!
 

Jackal

Gretschie
Jan 23, 2016
215
MO
On my G5420T, I removed the bridge screws and carefully filed the threads out of the holes so the screws fit snugly, but now just lift right off. I then sanded the bridge to match the contour of the top so it sits flat against the body. Prior to filing the screw holes, I was not able to get it to lay flat.
 

FiveAces

Gretschie
Mar 1, 2009
289
San Diego, CA
On my G5420T, I removed the bridge screws and carefully filed the threads out of the holes so the screws fit snugly, but now just lift right off. I then sanded the bridge to match the contour of the top so it sits flat against the body.....

Just curious... did you experience a significant change in sound after the mod? I have an old 5120 (2006) with a true floating bridge, and just sanding the base to match the guitar top made a significant change in sound!
 

FiveAces

Gretschie
Mar 1, 2009
289
San Diego, CA
On my G5420T, I removed the bridge screws and carefully filed the threads out of the holes so the screws fit snugly, but now just lift right off. I then sanded the bridge to match the contour of the top so it sits flat against the body. Prior to filing the screw holes, I was not able to get it to lay flat.
...just to clarify, you opened up the holes in the wooden base so that it no longer gets hung up on the threaded studs, right?
 

Jackal

Gretschie
Jan 23, 2016
215
MO
It did seem to make a significant difference, and was certainly worth the time and effort. Also pairs nicely with a TruArc bridge. Hopefully someone who is much better at describing tonal differences can chime in with their experience. IIRC it seemed to make most of a difference on the bottom end and the guitar body seemed "alive" afterward. This thing was lifeless out of the box though. I had to raise the pups and adjust the poles quite a bit.

I filed out the holes in the guitar top as minimally as possible with a needle file, not the bridge itself. I just use the screws as pins now. There is zero slop in the fitment. I wanted as much contact / surface area as possible.
 

David MacNeill

Electromatic
Gold Supporting Member
Nov 13, 2022
44
Boise ID
On my G5420T, I removed the bridge screws and carefully filed the threads out of the holes so the screws fit snugly, but now just lift right off. I then sanded the bridge to match the contour of the top so it sits flat against the body. Prior to filing the screw holes, I was not able to get it to lay flat.
That’s way too ambitious for me to consider attempting. I like this guitar exactly as it is, and at $749 it’s a steal. I like the fact that the bridge is screwed into the top. That seems like the best way to connect the bridge and top for maximum energy transfer, and certainly makes the guitar easier to travel with. I imagine that if tune-o-matic bridges existed back in the day, Gretsch would have screwed them into the top back then.
 

FiveAces

Gretschie
Mar 1, 2009
289
San Diego, CA
I filed out the holes in the guitar top as minimally as possible with a needle file, not the bridge itself. I just use the screws as pins now. There is zero slop in the fitment. I wanted as much contact / surface area as possible.

Yes, that makes sense. (my previous thought on filing the bridge base holes was definately wrong... that would render the wooden base functionally useless!).
Looking into this further, and for any useful info for others, there is another way the secured bridge can be made as a more conventional "pinned" bridge, and be totally reversable if you are concerned about permanent mods...

1) Remove the studs and bridge from the guitar.
2) Insert a 1" allen screw of the corrct thread into both inserts on the body an adjust them such that they protrude aprox. 1/4" above the guitar surface. These will serve as the new locating pins for the wooden base.
3) Drill out the 2 holes ONLY 3/8" DEEP FROM THE BOTTOM SIDE of the wooden base. The idea is to just open up the holes enough to create clearance for the new pins. This way the pins will serve as locating the bridge, let allow it full floating properties.
4) Before placing the wooden bridge base back on the guitar, back out the original studs (of the base) enough so they allow the base to contact the guitar surface when placed over the pins. Adjust the bridge height height as needed. Depending on your bridge height setting, you may want to replace the original threaded studs with shorter ones.

If done correctly, the process can be fully reversed to its original design!

I hope I didn't get over involved in the details, but hoped that someone may benefit from the option if they've been considering such a mod..... :cool:
 

TConnelly

Electromatic
Gold Supporting Member
Jun 5, 2022
22
Sandy Or.
I was a bit concerned about this before I bought mine. But I checked with a piece of thin receipt paper around the bridge feet like you would checking for bridge lift on an acoustic guitar. I couldn't get it under any point of either foot. So I'm satisfied with it. Intonation is fine, so I don't see a need to do any mods to mine.

Cheers..........................Todd
 


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