Fender just laid off a whole bunch of people.

DougWheeler74

Synchromatic
Jul 10, 2019
680
NE Wisconsin, US
IMHO, it will take a while for the whole large scale employer/employee relationship thing to filter out. I am retired IT and been through it in what was a long term stable industry (paper). All things change and that did as wll. I was lucky to survive 3 downsizings in one year. Of course, I went from computer based instrumentation to IT because I was downsized. After going from federal employment to academic to industry due to instabilities it was great for a while. Then the business as family faded and it became transactional - my labor for their money. I did enjoy the work and my co-workers were good, but at the end of the day it was still transactional. On the other hand, I have friends who worked either for themselves or for small companies where it wasn't like that. Those of us that live in the US live in a capitalist economy which means goods like guitars will go through highs and lows. Just some thoughts. Meanwhile, my compassionate understanding goes out to all those who are let go. I've been there and it sucks.
 

Emergence

Gretschie
May 25, 2022
437
New York
I managed to retire from my last employer after 35 years. I survived downsizings, restructuring, office politics, guys shown the door who only wanted to climb the ladder. I worked on compliance issues through the pandemic. How does one survive? It’s a combination of luck and knowing things before those around me realized they needed knowing.

That said, I have no advice but plenty of compassion for those who get caught up in world events and economic uncertainty. I was almost unbelievably lucky through my working life. I also made good choices and made the most of opportunities offered. I could say the cream rises to the top, but sometimes it gets skimmed off, made into butter, spread on a roll, and eaten. Luck plays a big part and it’s mostly beyond our control. Our choices are most important. Each choice changes our path and affects the choices available at the next juncture.
 

Back in Black

Country Gent
Jun 22, 2020
1,404
Ontario Canada
Something ain't right. A supposed boom, ka-boom of jobs in July, but all I hear and read about are layoffs, early retirements and no hiring and even warehouses so jam packed they have to expand for more inventory coming in. Somethings not right.

TM,

You are just on the verge of beginning to understand!

BIB.
 

Highroller

Country Gent
Jun 11, 2015
2,030
Portland, OR
Seems like regardless of the field, there's no such thing as job security anymore. Loyalty and hard work gets rewarded with a layoff notice a month before your retirement date. Or if you're younger, you just get canned with the shift of the winds.

It's a sorry state.

But regarding Fender, as much as they'd like us all to believe they're a "cool company" making these awesome rock'n'roll machines, at the end of the day they're just another multi-national corporation like all the others. They're not publicly traded, but still have their investors and stakeholders. They look at the bottom line and go from there. If that means layoffs, so be it.

It's Money first. Always.
 

sgarnett

Synchromatic
Apr 14, 2020
945
Kentucky
Seems like regardless of the field, there's no such thing as job security anymore. Loyalty and hard work gets rewarded with a layoff notice a month before your retirement date. Or if you're younger, you just get canned with the shift of the winds.

It's a sorry state.

But regarding Fender, as much as they'd like us all to believe they're a "cool company" making these awesome rock'n'roll machines, at the end of the day they're just another multi-national corporation like all the others. They're not publicly traded, but still have their investors and stakeholders. They look at the bottom line and go from there. If that means layoffs, so be it.

It's Money first. Always.
Definitely money first. In my experience though, companies grossly overestimate their ability to rehire, and grossly underestimate the true cost of lost knowledge and experience. Also, employees who are young, skilled, and portable will jump ship as soon as a reorg/restructuring is announced instead of waiting to see if they are cut. I’ve spent the last 18 months rebuilding my team after it was decimated just as the workload was exploding … again.
 

radd

Friend of Fred
Dec 27, 2017
5,860
Santa Cruz
What's morale.

Hard to find in a lot of work environments.

I supervised folks for most of my career. The last 20 yrs I ran a division and we kept the morale up and we made it a fun place to be. I hired good people and let them do their job without micro managing. When they had a problem, they came to me and we fixed it together.

I was also very careful who worked with us. We had a one year probation. Grumpy negative folks did not make it through probation. A person did not have to be a Pollyanna to stay but they had to be pleasant.

We all became good friends and hung out and partied together. I’m retired now and still have friends that I supervised.

My employee philosophy, hire good people, give them the freedom to do their job and treat them like gold. I learned from a good City manager that when I was in front of him and City Council at weekly Council meetings give all the credit to the employees when things go well and take the heat yourself when things don’t go well.
 
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G5422T

Country Gent
May 24, 2012
4,073
usa
I supervised folks for most of my career. The last 20 yrs I ran a division and we kept the morale up and we made it a fun place to be. I hired good people and let them do their job without micro managing. When then had a problem, they came to me and we fixed together.

I was also very careful who worked with us. We had a one year probation. Grumpy negative folks did not make it through probation. A person did not have to be a Pollyanna to stay but they had to be pleasant.

We all became good friends and hung out and partied together. I’m retired now and still have friends that I supervised.

My employee philosophy, hire good people, give them the freedom to do their job and treat them like gold. I learned from a good City manager that when I was in front of him and City Council at weekly Council meetings give all the credit to the employees when things go well and take the heat yourself when things don’t go well.

Great post.

"Micro Managing" can take a top department or company and turn it into a septic tank quickly.
 

wabash slim

I Bleed Orange
Feb 10, 2010
17,732
lafayette in
One thing I’ve grown tired of is going to places and hearing the excuse no one wants to work. While it’s true for some industries and situations. Other times it’s starting to feel like a get out of jail card and excuse for poor service.
People quit bad managers more than any other reason. Poor pay, bad working conditions, and dead-end jobs are up there as well.
 

Merc

Friend of Fred
May 6, 2017
5,469
Florida
I can hear you.
Our company is "decruiting" 10.000 people. That`s one third of it`s workpower.
Since I am old and very expensive I am one of the people on top of their list.

During the last couple of months they worked with me on an early-retirement-plan.
I put my sign on the contract yesterday.
Feel better now.

Congratulations! Any big plans?
 

loudnlousy

Gretschified
Oct 18, 2015
12,383
Germany
Congratulations! Any big plans?
There are three financial scenarios on Dec.31.2023:
- If I could manage to get a new job with similar pay (which is -sadly- not so easy because of my age) , I will work 5 further years until official retirement.
- If I cannot find a o.k.-paid job I will take a three-year-sabbatical (one of them living on my savings and two years of them are paid by my unimployment-insurance). Then I will take on some easy job for the remaining two years until official retirement-age.
- If my family and I could manage to spend the money really economical I could live on the dismissal-wage until official retirement at 63.

So basically I may work (and live a finanicially opulent life) but I don`t have to (and live a financially more modest livestyle). That`s an incredible privilege.

Since my mother, my son and my wife are very ill I will have to spent a lot of time taking care of them.

I would love to go to the university as a guest auditor. Music or philosophy would be nice disciplines.

I dream of playing in at least three different bands and touring with them regularily for a few weeks per year. That would be the coolest way to spend my future holidays .
 
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Lou Coppolino

Gretschie
Jul 23, 2022
361
Howell, NJ
The bottom line is that you're as good as your last paycheck.

It's cynical but it's a fact.

You're a good soldier when you're needed.

My buddy was a work from home IT specialist.

He's in his 60's.

He's woked for his company for over 20 years.

He made great money.

He was replaced by 2 college grads, that together make less than half of my buddies salary.

He's now unemployed.

I'm self employed.

All my benifits are on me.

I get zero pay for vacation or sick days.

I've made as much as $16K in a week and $250.00 in a week.

It's a financial crap shoot.
 

Merc

Friend of Fred
May 6, 2017
5,469
Florida
There are three financial scenarios on Dec.31.2023:
- If I could manage to get a new job with similar pay (which is -sadly- not so easy because of my age) , I will work 5 further years until official retirement.
- If I cannot find a o.k.-paid job I will take a three-year-sabbatical (one of them living on my savings and two years of them are paid by my unimployment-insurance). Then I will take on some easy job for the remaining two years until official retirement-age.
- If my family and I could manage to spend the money really economical I could live on the dismissal-wage until official retirement at 63.

So basically I may work (and live a finanicially opulent life) but I don`t have to (and live a financially more modest livestyle). That`s an incredible privilege.

Since my mother, my son and my wife are very ill I will have to spent a lot of time taking care of them.

I would love to go to the university as a guest auditor. Music or philosophy would be nice disciplines.

I dream of playing in at least three different bands and touring with them regularily for a few weeks per year. That would be the coolest way to spend my future holidays .

Oh, I thought it was retired retirement. I wish you the best. Sometimes things are a blessing and happen for good reason that don’t become apparent until much later.
 

Henry

I Bleed Orange
Apr 9, 2014
18,715
Petaluma
Something ain't right. A supposed boom, ka-boom of jobs in July, but all I hear and read about are layoffs, early retirements and no hiring and even warehouses so jam packed they have to expand for more inventory coming in. Somethings not right.
Those are net jobs. In our economy, businesses are supposed to rise and fall, and when they fall, they free up labor and capital for new ventures. This is kind of like the weather. People say that since winter is colder the fact that cannot be named cannot be a fact. Overall temperature is warmer does not mean that every single place on the globe is warmer. What is likely to happen is that winters are 1 degree cder, but summers are 1.1 degrees warmer, so net thermal mass is higher.

Same with unemployment. Just because new employment is up does not mean every single job out there is still around. It means that for every 1 job lost, there may be 1.1 new jobs.
 

Bertotti

Friend of Fred
Jul 20, 2017
9,547
South Dakota
There are jobs all around me. Sadly try getting someone into a manufacturing role where it may be hot stinky busy work, they can go to McD or GetnGo and make the same or more.
I'm salary and we have openings for three people sadly getting them has turned into a pain. We travel a lot. We have to be good at mechanical, pneumatic, hydraulic, electric electronic And able to use critical thinking to fix whatever we are working one. Then step back met an owner and do production audits streamline the process making it more efficient, more cost effective, track costs and impact on adjustments and failures. You can’t get people with 10% of those skills so your stuck trying to get someone who is trainable. Another issue, people coming in don’t want it work, think they know it all, ah, you might say you get what you pay for but these guys will make as much as the average two income family. The kids are not learning any real skilled trades. And the desire to stay cool at a desk in a computer seems to drive everyone who applies even after reading the job description. I keep telling my kids, learn to fix things because people skilled in that are few and far between.

Owners of these facilities are screaming for more automation. They can’t get people either or what they get is all but worthless and not worth the money they are paid. Kind of a self defeating phase for the employees in my world. I would replace 90% of them with machines if I could. The 10% I would keep are on time, ddont call in for any stupid reason or just for an extra day off, the do their job do it well and are reliable. what is really sad is the job isn’t very hard you just have to pay a little bit of attention and not try to take a 5 minute break every 20 minutes.

My experiences make me wonder what lead to these Fender layoffs.
 

Duo Slinger

Country Gent
Sep 11, 2020
1,178
California, USA
One thing I’ve grown tired of is going to places and hearing the excuse no one wants to work. While it’s true for some industries and situations. Other times it’s starting to feel like a get out of jail card and excuse for poor service.
Can confirm, we do wanna work. They just don't wanna hire, keeps costs down.
 


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