Does Music From Certain Years Appeal To You, More The Music From Other Years?

Synchro

The artist formerly known as: Synchro
Staff member
Jun 2, 2008
26,401
Tucson
Great thoughts, Highroller. Definitely, there were watershed years, many of which followed the release of a groundbreaking album, such as Kind Of Blue. That album influenced Jazz for a long, long time. Yes’ Fragile seemed to be a watershed for Prog’ Rock, and there were a lot of similar efforts Which followed.

The effects of radio, as a source of new music, were huge. When I was in my teens, there were two AM Top 40 stations in Denver, and almost everybody I knew would be listening to one of those two stations. We all heard new songs at the same time. When the Beatles came along, they literally dominated the charts, for a short while. Nowadays, the charts are only part of the story. People can, and do, create their own mixes on Spotify, or other platforms. It may be a good thing, from the standpoint of choice, but something was lost along the way, and that had value too.

When the Beatles reached their peak of popularity in the US, they held the top 5 positions on the Hot 100, and had 7 other songs on that chart, at the same time. What are the odds of something like that ever happening again? Top 40 radio served a purpose, in that it sorted songs, based on mass popularity. It wasn’t, entirely, a bad thing. It provided a cultural adhesive.
 

Gregor

Country Gent
Oct 17, 2018
1,361
New Brunswick, Canada
It seems to me most folks are into the music from their formative years, their teens
Well now, ain't that the truth? There's something about the "good Ole days". I still play a lot of the music from my teenage years (50's and early 60's...yes, I'm that old) simply because it brings back fond memories for me.
I was somewhat influenced by my dad who played percussion in bands in the 40's and 50's and beyond until he was in his 80's. As a result I grew up in the big band era of Glen Miller, the Dorsey Brothers, Benny Goodman, etc. Loved that era as well.
There's certainly a lot of great music since but also some terrible stuff that is hard for me to swallow ...I'm thinking Rap music for one, but that's just me. My grandkids love it.
 
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drmilktruck

I Bleed Orange
May 17, 2009
19,762
Plymouth, MN
Music has a unique way of tying specific songs or artists to events. I was thinking about it the other day when I heard "Driver's Seat" by Sniff n the Tears. That song forever reminds me of Sunday nights in high school, listening to the radio in the dark before falling asleep.

I became aware of music in 1973-74 and listened to Top 40 radio, so those songs trigger memories of that time. The Beatles conjure up 7-8th grade (although I discovered them second hand, after they broke up.) As a result I'm not as tied to new music from those years. High school has its own vibe: Graham Parker, Elvis Costello and the punks. College music (early 80s) is probably the strongest association though, as I was away from home, surrounded by like minded people who loved the music I did. I was on the college radio station too (overnights!) Med school is an understandable blur, with few strong musical connections, except for when we'd all watch MTV in the apartment after coming back from the hospital. Residency is even worse. Finally, the early 90s are the last time I was seriously invested in new music - lots of life change - first practice, marriage, first house, moved back to Minnesota. Nirvana and their compatriots bring back those times. My son arrived in 1996 and that's it for paying much attention to new music.

Interestingly though, as Mrs MT and have started going to concerts frequently, the artists we see (I knew their music at the time it was new, but they weren't necessarily favorites) now have their own associations, as my wife can share them now and since we both heard them back in the day, we have a connection to each other in that time as well. Sort of like time travel!
 
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Bkat

Electromatic
Dec 8, 2013
56
Illinois
I’m old, so almost all my “good years” are planted well back in the last century. But I do recall 2007 and 2009 as a pretty good years. Not so many since then, nothing much at all since about 2012.

Everything’s looking backwards these days. Almost all of the “new” music I pick up on seems to be decidedly retro, albeit sometimes with a more modern twist.
Ha. Yes. Not so long ago I stumbled across this current video of some alt band. Their music sounded spot on to stuff a whole bunch of people back in the 80s cobbled together on Tascam 4-track recorders. (I miss those days of technological minimalism.) New Order bassline. Drum machine. Chorused guitar. Monotone lyrics.

It comes down to the fact especially with popular (commercial) music, "what's old is new again." Not so long ago I saw a teen wearing a leather jacket with The Misfits logo painted on the back and wondered, "Do you listen to them or is that your dad's old jacket from 1985?"

I don't want to sound old, but it probably is because of the internet like Highroller alludes to, so there's a lot more recycling of musical trends than when we were young... err... younger.

I mean, say you listened to The Clash in high school back in the early 1980s. That was forty years ago. Now time warp yourself back to that time period and look at music from forty years prior. You'd be wearing a Benny Goodman Orchestra t-shirt to gym class to cover the same time span.

This doesn't mean there isn't "new" music to discover. I've found as I've gotten older, I dig into genres that I may have missed- or like an archaeological dig I'll unearth the earlier roots of music I've liked for decades to find new treasures- and I suppose it's because I don't feel as bound to music of my current "time" since I've grown beyond that.
 

afire

Friend of Fred
Feb 12, 2009
5,723
Where the action is!
It seems to me most folks are into the music from their formative years, their teens.
While no doubt generally true, I'm personally about a generation behind. While late '80s and early '90s should be my jam, it's the late '50s and early '60s that I'm into. And it runs in the family. My dad was a teen in the late '50s and early '60s, but he was more interested in big band and Dixieland.

If I had to pick a year, it would be 1963. Lots of great music in general, but I'm a Beatles fan first and foremost and if I had to choose between their output in 1963 vs. their output from 1964 to 1969, I wouldn't think twice. If they had broken up at the end of 1963, they would still have been the best rock band of all time.
 

wabash slim

I Bleed Orange
Feb 10, 2010
18,292
lafayette in
Well now, ain't that the truth? There's something about the "good Ole days". I still play a lot of the music from my teenage years (50's and early 60's...yes, I'm that old) simply because it brings back fond memories for me.
I was somewhat influenced by my dad who played percussion in bands in the 40's and 50's and beyond until he was in his 80's. As a result I grew up in the big band era of Glen Miller, the Dorsey Brothers, Benny Goodman, etc. Loved that era as well.
There's certainly a lot of great music since but also some terrible stuff that is hard for me to swallow ...I'm thinking Rap music for one, but that's just me. My grandkids love it.
90% of everything is garbage, and only 1% is excellence. I'm not a rap or hip-hop fan, but, I understand it. My folks hated the rock and the roll, and weren't too fond of C&W. Each to their own. It'd be a pretty boring world if there were only one type of music. I don't care if the kids listen to rap or hip-hop. It's theirs, a sign of the times. I'd rather hear some of that instead of death metal and others of that ilk. Screaming at me isn't going to make me listen. The only thing that annoys me is when your music is so loud that I can't hear mine. Monster car stereos are idiotic. Sure, you have a right to listen to music, but, your rights only go out as far as mine do.

Forcing others to listen to your stuff is wrong. My brother had one of those little FM transmitters that would enable you to play your CD Walkman thru your car radio by tuning to an empty channel. He set it to the same frequency as the local Hip-Hop station (from the University of Notre Dame, of all places). He'd play polkas or Irish folk tunes and watch the kids in the cars next to him try to figure out what happened to their tunes.

My folks were big band fans. Mom was a jitterbug fan, and Dad, having been in the Mighty 8th Air Force, was a huge Glenn Miller fan. I can enjoy some Big Band myself. I also enjoy a lot of Sousa having worked with university bands for 40 years---and done a lot of marching while in the service.

There's something out there for everyone. I don't think that there's anybody that doesn't like some kind of music.
 

schwarzerHund

Gretschie
Jan 1, 2022
173
Isla de Encanta
I think there are points in time when there are good musicians and writers that feed off each other. I'm thinking about Brian Wilson and the Beatles in the mid 60's- things of that nature. Progressive Rock, hard rock bands in the 70's, etc. When a band or bands are putting out good music, I think it inspires contemporaries- sometimes to 'match' or 'outdo' other bands- a natural competitive thing that feeds creativity. Maybe that clumps good music together in some ways.
 

juks

Country Gent
Nov 26, 2020
2,858
Fremont, California
Not years per say but genres that obviously came around at certain time period.

I think its a true point that what you listen when you are 16 follows you the rest of your life.

My favorite music dates from 60s through early 80s, after that there are favorites but not a whole bunch of bands at the same years.

Nowadays there's really nothing. Can't remember when I last time heard a current band I'd have any interest in.
 

Back in Black

Country Gent
Jun 22, 2020
1,519
Ontario Canada
Something I noticed, throughout my life, is that there are certain years where I seem to find a lot of songs to like, while other years, not so much. I’ve often wondered why this was the case. Conversely, there are other years where the music left me cold, and while there may be some songs of enduring popularity in those years, none of these songs seem to have any positive emotional value, to me.

This is a phenomenon I have noticed in myself, since childhood. Even when I was young enough thst I had relatively little life history to reflect upon, I can remember nostalgia for songs I remember having heard on the radio, in the past, but hadn’t heard lately. I also remember, after my older sister moved out on her own, turning on the radio and being disappointed, because the songs we had to which we had listened, together, were no longer getting airplay.

So the question becomes, is it me, or is it just a coincidence that some great songs came out during a certain year, or is this a product of conditions that particular year inspiring great music? At least, to begin with, I won’t post any of my favorite music years, because I don’t want to risk influencing the responses, but I’d be curious to hear the experiences of others, and if they have certain years when the music on the radio just seemed better.

One more thought is that I’m not talking about the year your favorite song was released, but am thinking in terms of years where there were a lot of songs that you liked, when it seemed like the songs being released just touched you as a listener.

What say you?

Hey S,

For me, it's not so much years, as it is individual songs.

For years I was lost in the ''British Invasion'', then there were groups like the Byrds, The Sweet, Thin Lizzy, Lynyrd Skynyrd. Now I find myself lost in certain songs from Motorhead.

For me, those very special songs sung by the Beatles, David Bowie, Kinks, the Knack, the above mentioned groups would have all been favorites of mine, regardless of year.

It's all in the song...Yesterday, Bells of Rymney, Fox On The Run, Whiskey In The Jar, That Smell, Gene Genie, Lola, My Sherona, The Ace Of Spades.

To me, all these songs hold on and never let go. Year has nothing to do with it.
 

Shock

Synchromatic
Sep 7, 2020
616
Minnesota
To my way of thinking, 1971 was the year that Rock n’ Roll grew up.

Not to mention 2 great Alice Cooper albums! Many started calling the Cooper band the world's best rock band. Little did we know at the time it was a lot to do with producer Bob Ezrin. His first effort was Love it to Death.
 

drmilktruck

I Bleed Orange
May 17, 2009
19,762
Plymouth, MN
To my way of thinking, 1971 was the year that Rock n’ Roll grew up. The introspective music of James Taylor, combined with adoption of more complex harmonic structures, led to some great creations.

Mudslide Slim - James Taylor, 1971
Tapestry - Carole King, 1971
Fragile - Yes, 1971
Led Zeppelin IV, 1971
Ram - Paul McCartney, 1971
L.A. Woman - Doors, 1971

‘77 was the year when Fleetwood Mac Rumors all but conquered the airwaves, But we were also listening to several tracks from Hotel California, Boz Skaggs Silk Degrees, the Little River Band’s Diamantina Cocktail, and the Atlanta Rhythm Section’s Rock and Roll Alternative. There was a lot of turf covered that year.
There was a book from a few years ago that agrees with you that Rock grew up in 1971.

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LivingMyDream

Friend of Fred
May 4, 2016
6,825
Peculiar, Missouri
Great answer.

Ok, going back to my early years, I have fond memories of music from 1968, 1971, 1977 and 1980. In most cases, you could extend those years back a couple of months into the prior year, so I have a strong recall of taking note of music in late 1970, and just loving much of what I heard in 1971. 1977 and 1980, were much the same. There seems to be a three year cycle, but 1974, was not one of my favorite years for music.

So, the question, the burning question, reduces to this; were there differences in the music being released in those years, or is the difference in my receptiveness towards new music?

‘70 into ‘71, was a pivotal time period in my life. I had nearly died and worked my way back to health, over a period of several months. ‘76 into ‘77 involved some serious changes in my life, including a move of nearly 1,000 miles, and ‘79 into ‘80 involved more changes, and another move. So those good music years did coincide with significant life events, and I wonder if that plays a role. 1968 was the year my parents made a big move, so my nostalgia for that music could be sort of a homesickness sort of thing.

I would also state that the good music years were all years with a lot of social activities. All of the good music years tend to be good years, in their own right. They weren’t necessarily prosperous years, but they were years when I was building towards something good, in my life.

What prompted this thread, at this time, was the recent purchase of a couple of CDs, which I subsequently listened to on my daily bike rides. One CD was Fragile, by Yes. I had loved Roundabout, when it was getting airplay, and had heard other cuts of that album, back in the day, but hadn’t ever listened to the entire album. The sights and sounds of 1971 came right back to me. (The entire album impressed me. It was like Bach had written Rock n’ Roll.)

The second CD was Frampton Comes Alive, which I was spurred to explore after watching a Rick Beato video which analyzed some of Frampton’s work. I had heard the three singles, Baby I Love Your Way, Do You Feel Like We Do, and Show Me The Way. This album was played to death in late 1976 and I remember it as a seamless lead-in to the music of 1977, which gave us a lot of great music that happened that year.

But this goes a lot deeper. Nearly 20 years ago, I started to assemble collections of songs I would burn onto CDs, usually by year of release. My good-music years filled up fast, requiring at least two packed CDs, while some of the off years were slim pickin’s. As I recall, 1975 was especially challenging. Interestingly, 1975 was not a great year for me, overall.

I love to use music as a time machine. I’ve always had a good memory, and replaying songs from a particular era reminds me of various times on my life. With all of the ups and downs, there are some great moments to remember, and music was always a big part of life, back in those days. We talked about songs, played songs, sang along with the radio, and if there was something new on the airwaves, you can wager that my circle of friends would be talking about it.

I suspect that my “good-music-years” coincided with years when things were going well in the rest of my life, but in the next breath, I have to say that 1971, 1977 and 1980 did have some fine music.

To my way of thinking, 1971 was the year that Rock n’ Roll grew up. The introspective music of James Taylor, combined with adoption of more complex harmonic structures, led to some great creations.

Mudslide Slim - James Taylor, 1971
Tapestry - Carole King, 1971
Fragile - Yes, 1971
Led Zeppelin IV, 1971
Ram - Paul McCartney, 1971
L.A. Woman - Doors, 1971

‘77 was the year when Fleetwood Mac Rumors all but conquered the airwaves, But we were also listening to several tracks from Hotel California, Boz Skaggs Silk Degrees, the Little River Band’s Diamantina Cocktail, and the Atlanta Rhythm Section’s Rock and Roll Alternative. There was a lot of turf covered that year.

For me’ 80 was the same. Ambrosia did some fine R&B inspired material, and the Doobie Brothers were rivaling Steely Dan as a sophisticated R&B band. Jackson Browne had Hold Out, and Pink Floyd had The Wall. IIRC, Alan Parsons did ok too, that year. There was more Boz Skaggs, and plenty of good Pop singles, as disco ground to a halt.

Strangely, after about 1981, I all but quit listening to current music, and know very little about music after the ‘80s.
I love the music of the ‘40s. My parents loved Big Band music, and introduced me to that music. Had it not been for Big Band music, I doubt that music would have developed as it did.

“think that our perspective of the quality of music directly correlates to the impact it has on us at the time it hits us.”

There‘s a lot to this. Perception of music is very dynamic. Songs that came along during crises, are almost universally distasteful to me. Songs that came along at times of hope and growth are remembered fondly.

The music of late 1970, and on into 1971 is filled with good memories. I don’t desire to come across as morbid, but in September of 1970, I was in the hospital, fighting for my life, and not at all certain that I would wake up the next morning. That sort of thing leaves a strong impression on one’s psyche.

When you’ve had to mentally accept that you are going to close your eyes to sleep, and might not open them again, you are a lot harder to scare in the future. I remember, vividly, the night that happened, and I remember waking up the next morning, thinking that I had survived … and obviously, I had. Everything changed, and I became a different version of myself.

The next few months were a time of rebuilding, and I experienced life differently. My memories of that time are quite vivid; the sights, the sounds, the colors; they all seemed more intense. I was just a kid, but I was a lot harder to intimidate, after that.

So it may be that I was just that much more receptive to music, during that time period, just as I was more receptive to many everyday experiences.

There are several comments stating that music of the last 20-30 years or so not being appealing, and I have to agree. The last Pop tune I recall taking note of was Carly Simon’s Coming Around Again. Much of what has come since strikes me as contrived, and artificial. There have been some exceptions, but they have become evermore rare.

Synchro, what you've said here resonates with me. "Frampton Comes Alive" was a major hit the same year that my parents bought me my first car - I was a junior in college. Forever those memories are connected. I think that most of the songs that I love the most are because they spoke to the important moments of my life, and they remain touchstones to those memories.

I also have had great memories of times with my children, and even though I might not think that a specific time period had great songs, there were still some that became special because my children loved them. In the same way, it gives me a warm feeling to know that my children are connected with songs because of our relationship. My son called me one day and told me that he was going to see the Moody Blues, and he wished that I could have been able to go with him. I was enough that he expressed how he remembered that I liked listening to their music. Going to see them made him feel closer to me. I live with my daughter now, and one Alexa was streaming music from "my era" while she was working in the kitchen. When I mentioned that it was my music, she said she like it too, because she grew up hearing it.

My mother enjoyed a wide variety of music, including much contemporary music because that was what her children enjoyed. My father was loved Big Band 40's music, Beethoven - love the 5th Symphony, Rossini's "William Tell Overture," Andy Williams, and Herb Alpert and the Tijuana Brass. Today Beethoven's 5th Symphony came up on my playlist and I had great memories of listening to it with my dad.

In my life, there are just certain songs that just become mile markers, too. When I experienced my first kiss, it was at a New Year's Eve party. I went because my sister and her boyfriend (who became my brother-in-law) encouraged me to go. I was just an awkward high school freshman at the time, and there was an ice breaker game that required everyone to answer questions about what constituted a good kiss to you. The answers were used to pair up people conversation and a kiss at midnight. I was paired up with a Senior that was absolutely beautiful, we talked for a while, and we hit it off is a superficial way. When she sought me out at midnight and kissed me, the song "25 or 6 to 4" was playing. From that moment on, I have always been a Chicago fan. 😁😁
 

Synchro

The artist formerly known as: Synchro
Staff member
Jun 2, 2008
26,401
Tucson
There was a book from a few years ago that agrees with you that Rock grew up in 1971.
I’ve read that book, and agree. Music turned a corner towards the end of 1970, and the momentum built. A lot of progress in that year. I’ve gone through the Hot 100 for that year and took not of the songs I remembered. There was some great material, and some great variety.
Synchro, what you've said here resonates with me. "Frampton Comes Alive" was a major hit the same year that my parents bought me my first car - I was a junior in college. Forever those memories are connected. I think that most of the songs that I love the most are because they spoke to the important moments of my life, and they remain touchstones to those memories.

I also have had great memories of times with my children, and even though I might not think that a specific time period had great songs, there were still some that became special because my children loved them. In the same way, it gives me a warm feeling to know that my children are connected with songs because of our relationship. My son called me one day and told me that he was going to see the Moody Blues, and he wished that I could have been able to go with him. I was enough that he expressed how he remembered that I liked listening to their music. Going to see them made him feel closer to me. I live with my daughter now, and one Alexa was streaming music from "my era" while she was working in the kitchen. When I mentioned that it was my music, she said she like it too, because she grew up hearing it.

My mother enjoyed a wide variety of music, including much contemporary music because that was what her children enjoyed. My father was loved Big Band 40's music, Beethoven - love the 5th Symphony, Rossini's "William Tell Overture," Andy Williams, and Herb Alpert and the Tijuana Brass. Today Beethoven's 5th Symphony came up on my playlist and I had great memories of listening to it with my dad.

In my life, there are just certain songs that just become mile markers, too. When I experienced my first kiss, it was at a New Year's Eve party. I went because my sister and her boyfriend (who became my brother-in-law) encouraged me to go. I was just an awkward high school freshman at the time, and there was an ice breaker game that required everyone to answer questions about what constituted a good kiss to you. The answers were used to pair up people conversation and a kiss at midnight. I was paired up with a Senior that was absolutely beautiful, we talked for a while, and we hit it off is a superficial way. When she sought me out at midnight and kissed me, the song "25 or 6 to 4" was playing. From that moment on, I have always been a Chicago fan. 😁😁
Ultimately, music appeals to our sense of order, but it imprints deeply upon our memories, and stays there, because of its order. People with dementia retain their memories of music, longer than most other memories, and music from their earlier lives is therapeutic.

My dad loved music, and his tastes ranged from the music of the ‘20s, up to the music of the ‘60s, and on into the ‘70s. He introduced me to the music of Chet Atkins, Leroy Anderson, and the Ventures. He didn’t play music, although he was a gifted singer, but he did all he could to promote my interest in music. His tastes are part of who I am, and I’m fine with that; proud of it, in fact.

Perhaps you singled it out; music speaks to the important moments of our lives. I don’t think that anyone fully understands how our psyches operate, but it is my understanding that we tend to relive certain life experiences. So, if relatives dropped by and brought chocolate cake, you would have a mental imprint that associated chocolate cake with having relatives visit, and the pleasant memories of socializing with loved ones. Every time you ate chocolate cake, you would also stimulate the memories of family gatherings.

For you, 25 or 6 to Four reminds you of a kiss from a beautiful young woman, and for me, 25 or 6 to Four reminds me of when I had just got out of the hospital and would listen to music in my bedroom as a way to pass the time, while I recovered from peritonitis. It’s a positive association, in my mind, but if a certain pretty girl from school had dropped by and planted a kiss on me, that would have been welcome, as well. :)

Memories have power. Some years ago, my sister gave me a copy of a children’s book that had been my favorite, when I was very, very small. I opened it, and read through it, for the first time in many years, and when I finished, I actually experienced a physical sensation. It was like my mind was traveling back in time, then returning to the present. I was actually dazed for a few seconds. The only explanation I can come up with, is that old patterns of neural connections had been refreshed and it literally stimulated my brain. It was profound, but pleasant.

I have a good memory, and can recall details of relatively mundane conversations, even though they may have happened when I was just a kid. Our memories are all with us, but most are never accessed, once they are no longer important to our daily routine. Music, however, can bring us back to very particular experiences. For example, I know exactly where I was the first time I head Maggie May. The DJ said, “now, something new from Rod Stewart”, and I said to myself, “who the hell is Rod Stewart?” Then I heard that mandolin, that bass line and I knew I was hearing an absolute hit. Every time I hear that song, my mind remembers Winona Ct. in Westminster, CO, and the exact house I was driving past when it happened. If you stop to contemplate it, that’s a pretty powerful imprint.
 

Synchro

The artist formerly known as: Synchro
Staff member
Jun 2, 2008
26,401
Tucson
Music has a unique way of tying specific songs or artists to events. I was thinking about it the other day when I heard "Driver's Seat" by Sniff n the Tears. That song forever reminds me of Sunday nights in high school, listening to the radio in the dark before falling asleep.

I became aware of music in 1973-74 and listened to Top 40 radio, so those songs trigger memories of that time. The Beatles conjure up 7-8th grade (although I discovered them second hand, after they broke up.) As a result I'm not as tied to new music from those years. High school has its own vibe: Graham Parker, Elvis Costello and the punks. College music (early 80s) is probably the strongest association though, as I was away from home, surrounded by like minded people who loved the music I did. I was on the college radio station too (overnights!) Med school is an understandable blur, with few strong musical connections, except for when we'd all watch MTV in the apartment after coming back from the hospital. Residency is even worse. Finally, the early 90s are the last time I was seriously invested in new music - lots of life change - first practice, marriage, first house, moved back to Minnesota. Nirvana and their compatriots bring back those times. My son arrived in 1996 and that's it for paying much attention to new music.

Interestingly though, as Mrs MT and have started going to concerts frequently, the artists we see (I knew their music at the time it was new, but they weren't necessarily favorites) now have their own associations, as my wife can share them now and since we both heard them back in the day, we have a connection to each other in that time as well. Sort of like time travel!
That’s an interesting comment. As I mentioned earlier, I durn near bought the farm, when I was in my teens. I had Peritonitis, and they residents at the University of Colorado Medical Center worked very hard to meep me alive. After two weeks in isolation, I came home, and went through months of recovery. By evening, I’d be quite tired, and, much like your experience, I listened to the radio every night, before falling asleep. I’m right back in my bedroom, in my parent’s home, listening to the songs of the time, and starting to feel good, actually for the first time in my life. (Apparently I had chronic appendicitis since early childhood, and my health improved dramatically after the durned thing burst.)

Those songs still touch me, when I hear them. I don’t make a practice of fixating on any particular music, and I don’t live in the past, but the good feelings associated with that music are still vivid in my memory.

I would imagine that medical school, and residency, didn't leave a lot of time to spend on keeping up with the hits of the day. However, I’d also wager that you have some great memories of that time in your life.

Much like yourself, I lost interest in new music, at about the same stage in life, and have never had any desire to keep up with current music, be it Pop, Rock or Country. To me, it’s like new music doesn’t even exist. I was in a BBQ place, a few years ago, and they had some music that I would guess was contemporary Blues. It absolutely reeked. I could play better Blues with three broken strings and my arm in a cast. :) It was contrived, and phony; basically a caricature of Blues. Stevie Ray, BB, Muddy, or Billy Gibbons would probably have openly wept.

That brings up a question regarding the phenomenon of many people becoming less receptive to new music, at a certain point in life. Is it a developmental stage, where we no longer welcome new music? It strikes me that most people are most fervent about music before they settle down with a mate, and begin building a life. Is music primarily part of mating ritual? When I was 16, and idealistic, I couldn’t get enough of love songs, but nowadays, I find many of them hopelessly distanced from reality. So, when we start backing away from new music, is it a form of putting away the childish things in our life?

Or perhaps, we wish to settle into the comfort of the familiar, and don’t wish to adapt to new music. Another thought is that popular music is usually about the immediate present; so perhaps over time, we find the ways of the present less appealing, and prefer the cultural milieu of our own heyday?
 

Chet Harrison

Gretschie
Apr 27, 2020
271
USA
I've started keeping a list of my favorite albums. It's not complete, but here is some raw data-- the year, followed by the number of albums from that year that are on my list (studio albums and live albums, no compilations):

1956 1
1957 1
1958 2
1959 1
1960 2
1961 4
1962 2
1963 2
1964 6
1965 8
1966 8
1967 16
1968 18
1969 21
1970 19
1971 13
1972 8
1973 3
1974 2
1975 4
1976 1
1977 1
1978 1
1979 0
1980 0
1981 0
1982 0
1983 1
1984 0
1985 1
1986 0
1987 1
1988 2
1989 0
1990 2
1991 1
1992 4
1993 4
1994 3
1995 6
1996 6
1997 3
1998 3
1999 2
2000 4
2001 4
2002 4
2003 4
2004 3
2005 2
2006 2
2007 5
2008 0
2009 4
2010 2
2011 2
2012 2
2013 0
2014 8
2015 4
2016 4
2017 4
2018 1
2019 2
2020 5
2021 1


One-third of my favorite albums are from '67-'71.

FWIW, I graduated from high school in 1999.

I will never stop searching for new, good music.
 

LongJohn

Synchromatic
Apr 22, 2016
826
Queens, NY
I started listening to the radio around 1953, there were 4 am music stations. 2 of the stations played top 10 and the other 2 played big band, and the radio was always on. Fast forward to 1962 (?) and I was sitting outside with my best friend and a portable radio, we were waiting for the first FM broadcast in NYC. Married in 1977 and life became more about the living and less about the soundtrack. Don't think I own an album or cd from beyond 1985 with the exception of some Stray Cats CDs.
 

Bertotti

Friend of Fred
Jul 20, 2017
9,785
South Dakota
This depends entirely on wether you listen to mainstream radio or not. If I did the answer would be a definite yes but knowing with the internet I can find a lot of good music not played by mainstream radio then the answer is no.
 

Synchro

The artist formerly known as: Synchro
Staff member
Jun 2, 2008
26,401
Tucson
This depends entirely on wether you listen to mainstream radio or not. If I did the answer would be a definite yes but knowing with the internet I can find a lot of good music not played by mainstream radio then the answer is no.
It’s been a mixed blessing. On one hand, a lot of people’s tastes have been exposed to a wider variety of music, but the cohesiveness of the times when entire communities experienced the same music, simultaneously.
 


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