Are Gibson/Norlin Era Guitars Collectable?

hcsterg

Friend of Fred
Silver Member
Feb 13, 2012
6,868
France

Are Gibson/Norlin Era Guitars Collectable?​

Yes :

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Lou Coppolino

Country Gent
Jul 23, 2022
1,468
Howell, NJ
IMO, it depends on the player.

I don't care if a guitar is made on the moon.

Where ever it's made is fine, as long as it's a good one.

Vendor tend to put a high dollar on anything.

It just makes it harder for a working person to acquire.
 

loudnlousy

Gretschified
Gold Supporting Member
Oct 18, 2015
12,745
Germany
I don't care if a guitar is made on the moon.
You are right.
As I already stated, most of the time the maker is not the only culprit for a good sounding guitar but time and it`s impact on the wood.
There are absolute stellar Made in Japan Guitars from the period 1978 to 1985. These were usually the "better made" Strats and Les Pauls and they benefitted from aging for 40+ years, too.
In many cases Tokai +Co hat the older and nicer wood as a starting point for their guitars, too.

Fender and Gibson were saving money on their wood in that time. That`s the reason for so many super-heavyweight American guitars in the Norlin and CBS era.
 

Ricochet

Senior Gretsch-Talker
Gold Supporting Member
Nov 13, 2009
22,773
Monkey Island
With all the '50s and early '60s vintage guitars gone and locked up, we could see the focus shift towards late '60s instruments, but even those are getting pricey quick.
The next best thing to own something vintage for non offensive prices are '70s specimens. Going out on a limb, I'll state in most cases quality is of little consideration.
 

Synchro

The artist formerly known as: Synchro
Staff member
Jun 2, 2008
26,723
Tucson
Fender and Gibson were saving money on their wood in that time. That`s the reason for so many super-heavyweight American guitars in the Norlin and CBS era.
I’d never thought of that before, but it makes perfect sense.
With all the '50s and early '60s vintage guitars gone and locked up, we could see the focus shift towards late '60s instruments, but even those are getting pricey quick.
The next best thing to own something vintage for non offensive prices are '70s specimens. Going out on a limb, I'll state in most cases quality is of little consideration.
Unfortunately, you are probably right.
 

AZBrahma

Synchromatic
Dec 18, 2020
743
Arizona
Guitars, cars, a whole host of other consumer products.....US made products in the 70s were, generally, truly awful things. I've spent enough time with 70s Fenders, Gibsons, Gretschs, and other US guitars to know I won't waste my time because the odds are against me. This is exactly why pros starting seeking out and buying used pre-acquisition guitars instead of then-current gear. Of course there are good ones...occasionally. It's a numbers game at some point. The only good thing I recall happening in guitars during the 70s was 1976, when Schecter pioneered the custom guitar business, Hamer, and Japan eating the US guitar makers lunch and forcing them to up their quality.

Purposely buying a 70s US guitar besides a Schecter or Hamer (and maybe a few other tiny builders)....yeesh. A certain quote from PT Barnum comes to mind....
 

Lou Coppolino

Country Gent
Jul 23, 2022
1,468
Howell, NJ
Purposely buying a 70s US guitar besides a Schecter or Hamer (and maybe a few other tiny builders)....yeesh. A certain quote from PT Barnum comes to mind....

1970's Ibanez guitars are cool and pricey.

 


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